The Perils of Hospital Food

I realize I suddenly disappeared and thought I should explain.  My daughter is now 31 weeks pregnant; we almost did not make it to 31 weeks.  Last Tuesday she began having pre-term contractions that turned into a real crisis.  She was admitted to the hospital to stop the contractions and developed pneumonia.  We spent the week under the watchful eye of some very amazing nurses and doctors and thankfully, the contractions are under control.  I brought her home yesterday (September 10th) to begin five weeks of complete bed rest.

So what does this have to do with a food blog?  Oh, my friends, it has a lot to do with a food blog.  You see, you certainly do not fully appreciate food until you are forced to eat hospital food.  To call it “food” is giving it too much credit.  They brought her items that were supposed to be eggs, sausage, chicken, soup, and vegetables but they neither tasted nor looked like anything I have ever considered edible food.  I find this rather ironic because proper nutrition is the most important aspect of a healthy body.  How do they expect patients to eat properly if the food they serve is not appetizing in vision, smell, or taste?  What they serve is bland and unappealing that prompts patients to beg their families to grab something from some fast food joint to satisfy their hunger.  I understand the dieticians have to provide a nutritious meal however, they can do that and still make the food palatable.  What good is a nutritious meal if the patient does not eat it?

For example, the scrambled eggs they brought my daughter were bland, dry, and visually appalling.  They could have easily added a bit of cheese and diced tomatoes to give them a little taste and improve how they look.  If food looks good, people will at least try eating it but when it looks like something you would feed a dog, nobody will eat it.

They served a hunk of chicken breast covered with some type of white goo they called gravy.  The meat was rubbery, dry, and tough and had no flavor at all.  The gravy was the consistency of wallpaper paste with less taste.  The squash that was served with it was boiled until it turned to mush.  I do not even want to discuss the glob of stuff they called rice.

It takes very little effort or cost to add taste and appeal to ordinary food items like eggs, rice, chicken, and vegetables.   Staying in the hospital is bad enough but when you are fed meals that are uneatable, a weeklong hospital stay can seem to last a month.

As soon as I got my daughter home, I fixed her a healthy and fulfilling home-cooked meal.  I made homemade spaghetti sauce served over thick noodles with a side of sour dough garlic bread.  Now that is how you feed a patient.

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This entry was posted in Body/Mind/Spirit and tagged , , , , , by debbiestrange. Bookmark the permalink.

About debbiestrange

With 50 years of experience to share and the burning desire to connect with as many people across the world as possible, I write of the things in life that make us who we are. Family, food, and music, are just some of the things in life I cherish most. I am working towards a doctorate in psychology; currently on the Master’s level. What I have learned through life’s experiences I can apply to what I have learned academically. Human behavior and what makes people do the things they do, feel the things they feel, and live the way they live is my passion in life. The mysteries of life can, so often, be explained in practical terms; you just have to open your heart and mind to take them in. Knowledge is power. Wisdom is its fuel ~Debbie Strange

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